Nursing for Sports Medicine

Nursing for sports medicine is a big movement in local and general practice health. The popularity of gyms, sports, and teenage and high school league sports, as well as childhood league sports can crowd a waiting room with single patient injuries or an entire team of them. The demands of the nursing challenge for these situations test nurses on their diagnostic skills, patient communication skills, and observational aptitude for patients who may not want their physical conditions commented upon or checked out.

The high school and college professional team sports system is rife with excesses that endanger student health. Education system nurses should brush up on sports medicine for concussions, artificial performance enhancements in teenager and young adults, and other wellness related issues for young athletes and sports participants of any age. Anorexia, alcohol abuse, drug abuse, and illegal substances may cloud behavior and vital signs.  Nurses should learn to read patients of all ages that might conceal or confuse physicians who may not factor in other elements in the patient diagnosis due to a lack of information.

Occupational sports medicine can have a broad range of employment opportunities. A television show where the contestants lose weight should have a physical wellness consultant to examine patients during extreme events and competitions. A recreational cruise should have a competent nurse to review case of passengers who have disabilities or health issue before they come on board.

Nurses should know about the ramification of high school sports and college sports, and recreational sports play and how much delivers patents in pain to the hospital on a regular basis. Sadly, people have a mind to ignore hat their doctor tells them and play anyway. Nurse should be rote in the conditions of sports related concussions, trauma, bruising, bone breaks and sprains, muscle tears and the incidence and symptoms for a diagnosis of concussion.

Nurses for sports medicine might branch off after years of general health practitioner employment or LVN work in the treatment of sports-related concussions and other sports injuries. In children and teenage athletes, there is the potential for serious long-term outcomes, such as brain damage, dementia and other risks such as substance abuse after the injury or trauma. Weekend athletes are prone to even more injury because they are likely out of condition or aging, not warmed up or not wearing suitable support equipment.

Emergency rooms can be filled with skateboard kids, bikers, roller skaters and surfers who refuse to wear proper headgear, pads, knee guards, etc. Participating in sports activities in the wrong time and place can also result in physicial injury. Sports concussions have a window of serious concern following immediate hospitalization where the patient must be scrutinized for brain damage, motor neuron fluctuations, synapse irregularity, or other disorders of the brain.

The competent sports medicine nurse will be able to diagnose and define sports-related concussions and the seriousness of the and the sports in which they are most often found. Family friends, and the patient (and coach) will want to know the immediate and long-term symptoms of bone breaks, fractures, and sports-related concussions. Nurses can take the opportunity in seminars and clinicals to discuss expert recommendations for preventing and managing sports-related concussions, to pass onto students and patients.

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