What Nurses Need to Know About Cutting

Chronic consitions anf acute care crises are not the only area in which nurses serve their patients. Nurses must be vigilant to observe compulsive and dissociative disorders beginning among their patients in care. When a patient is at risk for harming themselves, the situation becomes a health care crisis.

Patients under monitoring will exhibit patterns of normal behavior. Then changes in a patient’s habits will stand out.  One aberrant behavior that signals the need for attention is cutting. Cutting may sound odd, even absurd to most people when first encountering the medical disorder. But cutting is no laughing matter. It can affect housewives, adolescents, students, and profession people of all ethnicities  and at every education level.

Yet the  problem of cutting is more widespread than thought at first, although experts cite early underreporting as a major factor. Many caregivers may not wish to risk their position on an intervention. Irregular nursing staffing can result in turnover that prevents consisted reliability between caregivers with an opportunity to see cutting symptoms.

Cutting is a problem that has become a recognized part of the vocabulary of disorders and psychological signs of emotional distress in people. Striking mainly juveniles and adolescents, cutting is a practice where the physical mutilation of the skin serves no purpose but abuse. Cutting flourishes in environments where body checks and inconsistent observation is the norm.

Both women and men suffer from cutting. The inclination will start small, and the disorder will build as the victim of cutting behavior learns to harm themselves routinely. Cutting may be hidden by hobbies such as carpentry, fishing, sports, and crafts where cuts and abrasions can be shrugged off as casual. Where cold weather can conceal skin condition, nurses should urge patients to change into a gown for evaluation. Many doctors who skip the full-body evaluation can miss the signs and symptoms of cutting right under their nose.

Cutters are trying to treat their emotional pain. The individual will start to experiment and transfer feelings of emotional pain to a physically concrete manifestation of cuts, bruises, lesions, in areas not regularly seen by others. This is regularly in the lower arms and forearms, which can be hidden by long sleeved clothing. The individual will withdraw from normal social activity if it reveals their cutting scars or lesions.

Therapy for cutting involves multiple disciplines. Treatment involves  confronting the cutter in a safe space and  from their caregivong usually takes the form of two tiers of treatment. Skin cuts are treated for infection and bandaged, and mild painkiller is prescribed. Psychiatric examination and counseling make up the other part of treating cutters.

It would seem that those in metaphorical pain would avoid seeking actual pain. Yet for many this is bringing their pain into the open. Wound care nurses should be wary of patients who pick at scabs or worsen wounds and lesions between dressings.   Yet the exhilaration and catharsis of the cutting ritual allows the individual to achieve emotional release from psychological pressure. Cutters can form bonds with website friends online part of the cutting world.

Cutting is usually done by persons who feel helpless to control important aspects of their lives. Cutting is generally a shameful secret they hide. Cutters should not be condemned, but take in recommending the case for treatment. Friends should report this to a doctor or physician for further investigation.

Signs and symptoms of self-injury may include dermal scars that can be seen in those who have been practicing the self-abuse of cutting for some time. Referrals to the appropriate speciaist are encouraged.

Cutters may distinguish themselves by having sharp objects like pins, knives, switchblades, or razors on hand. They may be seen to wear long sleeves on their arms  and long pants unseasonably in hot weather. Cutters often exhibit difficulties in having close friends near, or holding long-term friendships or have difficulties in interpersonal relationships. The intimacy and familiarity required in these relationships make it difficult for the cutter to hide the cutting habit.

The habit of cutting may become a compulsion for some , one they wish to hide. Conditions in the cutter’s life may lead them to question their existence and voice thoughts of hopelessness or confusion. Stressful life events such as loss of a loved one, decline in social contacts,and new changes in negative life experience may signal a potential for cutting.

The patient or individual will mull over questions about his or her personal identity, such as “Who am I?”, “Where am I going?,  “What am I doing here?” They may exhibit panic and confusion when confronted with obstacles.  Nurses should be alerted to patients with pronounced skin conditions and the above mentioned problems.

Patients involved in cutting behaviors will experience behavioral and emotional instability, such as uncontrolled crying or mood extremes.  Cuters may ecperience problems with impulse control, and be subject to violence aggressiveness or other taboo behaviors. Cutters form a new routine, replacing the chaotic unpredictability of their problems with the “control” of the cutting instigation.

There may be a detectable change in patients, from an external viewpoint. . A patient who usually goes out for a walk or shops with friends and suddenly elects to stay in or avoid phone calls may be a patient considering cutting or performing the cutting practice as a way of coping. The cutter’s disorder is marked acute when the individual finds solace or relief in cutting.

Nurses should discuss with the charge nurse, roommate, staff nurses and social if they have overheard the patient make statements of helplessness, hopelessness or worthlessness. Futility and despair are the emotional hallmarks of a cutter. Intervention is only possible if the caregiver or nurse steps in and speak up.

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