Nursing Career a Predictor of Depression?

What does current research tell us about depression, nursing work performance, and occupational health conditions? That the indicators are present of workplace burnout, PTSD, common mental disorders,  and weight gain from occupational nursing stress. Studies conducted by Weller, et. all., (2008), Peterson et all, (2008), Jolivet et al., (2010),  HS Lin, (2010), Greiger, (2007), Dillman, (1987), Welsh, (2009) , and more have contributed specific research to the body of knowledge surrounding nursing careers, job stress,  and depression. Colleagues of  Yohai, (1987) , Gartner, (2010), and Langleib (2008), also have conducted research that indicated higher instances of wellness problems from the negative impact of nursing work. The research underscores the key premise of evaluating nursing occupations as a predictor of depression.

Does nursing as a career function as a predictor of depression? This above body of research and its combinant conclusions supports increased review of depression as an occupation covariable of nursing as a work choice. The response of nursing employers, hospital wellness initiators, and occupational nursing consultants should be impacted accordingly.

Nursing requires long hours, pain and suffering, complex pharmaceutical regimens and physician-ordered therapeutic treatments. And that’s just what the patients have to go through! Nurses as occupational workers must study and internalize a great deal of empirical knowledge to perform their jobs. Then they must absorb dozens of personality types, workplace idiosyncracies, and patient preferences. This must be done working long hours with little structured rest and relief.

But as studies show, nurses on the whole pay a price for the stress of their workday responsibilities. Burnout is common.  And employers should pay attention to where their training investment is going. Because almost 80% of the respondents report at least one health problem that impacts work productivity.  More muscular support and improved employer and healthcare schemes for treatment of a signally underreported problem such as this should be immediately complemented by companies via employee outreach.

Participants in the depression studies also reported other signifiers of unhappiness, burnout, and workplace difficulty. Anxiety, sleep problems, medication interventions, errors involving safety and medication indicate a workplace disaster waiting to happen. Wellness, it seems, is a professional responsibility for nurses. But it should be an ethical responsibility from employers toward their nursing workforce.  A large portion of the depressive-skewing group showed problems with obesity, lack of mental well-being, and a marked loss of productivity. These factors directly relate to lessened ability to manage workplace tasks and nursing duties. This is not the “Dark Ages” of pink collar employment anymore. Nursing retention spells better quality of care for patients in every scenario.  But as the research shows, wellness institutions, hospital medical-surgical wards, and global nursing workplaces all show a heightened coefficient of depression, as a nurse’s career lengthens.  And for nurses and nursing employers to (still) sponsor a working environment that promotes medication errors and unnecessary instigation of poor nursing performance is of grievous concern. For the corpus of the population looking to nurses for healthcare, having a depressed nurse doing nursing tasks and performing services for you is an alarming possibility, and yet now a statistical probability.

Nursing institutions themselves can most concretely change the elements causing some of the depressive orientation in nursing occupational experiences. Lessening workplace impairment should be a cooperative goal between all parties. Workers suffering from Depression, reporting health and coping issues, and committing errors are a risk. Nurses at risk for impaired work performance do not make positive role models.The validity of depressive indicators across all samples illustrates a higher demand for employer assistance programs.

High rates of depression can occur in every profession from stockbrokers to firemen. But nurses are the kind of specialized workers that should know enough to recognise stress and intervene before formal depression takes hold. And healthcare managers are far from immune to depression either. According to Welsh’s study of 150 nurses, the estimated prevalence rate for major depression is above 20%. Job satisfaction and burnout are also reported, but experts theorize that much more internalized stress is simmering under the surface.  The etiology of depression and the implications of depressive symptom incidence in nursing employees transcends mere lifestyle and cultural backgrounds.

   Total Depression Score (TDS) is the factor that rates the individual as a participant in the depression-growth dynamic sketched in research literature. Nursing associations throughout the United States actively participate in these studies to prevent growth of occupational difficulty and regression. The gender factor remains somewhat skewed, as an overwhelming share of aging nurses are female. In the North Carolina study, 91%, of the respondents were female. As male populations in nursing occupations changes, more data will be available with more updated research. 

Finding out more about what causes nursing career stress can illuminate the changes necessary to minimize wear and tear on the ‘ candy-striped collar ‘ industry. In a cross -sectional survey performed across 2500 random North Carolina nurse samples, only 47% bothered responding despite a dollar bill being provided! ( The Dillman strategy.) This shows a discomfort present when half of all nurses have to come to grips with how depression is affecting them.

For those considering the nursing profession, statistics and studies exploring depression as a coefficient of occupational nursing have something to say. There is no ” free-ride” in any career. In a nursing career, as studies and depression literature indicate, the cost of interaction and wear and tear of being a nurterer and a caregiver may have hidden social costs. Workplace characteristics play into this trend. The occupational risk of depression in the nursing field co-varies with employment type, age, level of nursing education attained, and communication elements between other nurses at the place of work.

Many of the above research authorities noted obesity as a depressive co-factor, and a synthesis of high BMI and other depressive indicators in stressed out  nurse candidates suffering burnout. . While the stigma of being overweight and the concept of career dissatisfaction is not unique to nursing professionals, the clusters of other signifiers attending incidence of career longevity in nursing, as well as the obesity factor, are. But other factors such as overcrowding of the patients in the healthcare environment,  and a lessened ability to communicate with other staff can also exacerbate depressive trends. Communication operates to solve many problems, and its absence in a nursing envirinment is a sure sign of workplace dysfunction. And the communication breakdown does not only limit profession nursing performance.  In cultures where many individuals are cued to conceal concerns about their own mental wellness, nurses are not as reliable for self-reporting symptoms of depression.

The current research offers new treatment options for depressed nurses and those experiencing job stress. Computers can offer Lcd-enabled counseling interventions and Internet–based cognitive  therapy technologies. Nursing assistance strategies for support should quantifiably emphasize more robust participation in these programs. Healthcare employers should introduce employees to their mobile and smartphone pathways to wellness.  Brands such as Mind street, E-couch, and Moodgym are examples.

Incidence of depression, depressive tendencies, and behaviors associated with depressive symptoms have been tracked in nursing sample groups of varying occupational nurses around the world. From field hospitals in theaters of war to metropolitan hospital wards, the research compiles statistics and observations that hint at a need for organized proactive response. One study of German nurses reflected the combination of lowered mental health rating, health problems, and lowered workplace productivity. Registrations of continuous and consistent depressive problems in nursing professionals should be resonant enough, by now, to incite employer-side support.

Studies and literature from varying institutions and scholars have been actively researching the extent to which depression correlates with nursing.  Medical-surgical nurses and intensive care nurses show a stronger inclination to self-reporting depression or depressive symptoms. These symptoms are correlations of somatic complaints (trouble sleeping), major life events, addictive habits, and signifiers of occupational stress.

The burden on nurses is to support the healthcare mission of physicians in hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, and field hospitals. Any type of nurse, it seems, may be subject to depression as his or her age rises and their career longevity extends. Yet nurses receive education and training about the downside of depression and its impact on well-being. The research begs the question ‘Why can’t nurses actively discount depression in their own lives, let alone offer impactful interventions to their patients?” Employers and wellness institutions should answer this query with a set of nursing occupational supports that reinforce the investment nurses have made not only for their own careers, but for optimum patient-side medical care experiences as well.

 

Nurses and Depression: An Essay

Nursing and depression are a strange pair of entities that intersect at various points of the compass. Yet the nursing profession continues to walk an uneasy line between comprending depression as a patient symptom and experiencing depression  as a career side effect. Today nursing stands at a pivotal place in history, with academia, the origins of medicine, and progress pulling the threads of nursing theory every which way.

Nursing is a time-honored institution whose origins claims famous feminist icons such as Clara Barton, Margaret Sanger, Mary Breckenridge, and Florence Nightingale. But the feminist mystique itself has oudistanced the treatment and conventional wisdom surrounding depression as a medical concern. Depression, and the treatment of depression, for many people, can be a difficult concept to grasp. Depression is a psychiatric disorder of the mind and psyche which affects persons undergoing medical treatment, but can also originate as a harbinger of other diseases. Depression has almost become a slang term in the pop culture vocabulary used casually to descrive feeling “down”. Yet as a medical denominator, the presence of depression  is serious business.

Depression can be a symptom as well as a diagnosis. Yet the physical side of the medical and nursing fields can often override the psychological of many wellness crises. Conventional wisdom usually trumps academic progress. Commercial pharmaceutical treatment usually beats out long-term alternatives, and little endorsment is given to nontherapeutic analysis. The medical institution as a whole functions mostly to heal the body, and the psycho-analytic milestones in healing don’t keep pace with the limitation of treatment access options for the afflicted. Dabbling in depression doagnosis is seen as specialist referral stuff. Medical professionals are all too familiar with these “rules of the road”.

Both doctors and nurses are more comfortable in general discussing medical symptoms according to a pathology of pure anatomy and disordered functions of the body. This is their clinical training taking over. This is understandable, as many facets of the psychological applications of depression treatment color between the lines of many disciplines. And ad hoc experimentation in the world of treatment for depression is uually not rewarded from a multiple of perspectives.

Too often, physicians skip over depression as a treatable illness and focus on the more concrete diagnoses of the body. In many cultures, psychological illness still carries a stigma from periods of civilization where too little was known about the causes and origins of depression. The onus of depressive symptoms as ‘”madness” still  remains.

Early man used drugs, societal separation, and medicinal forms of witchcraft to “treat” early forms of depression. Later cultures shipped mad people offf to sea, in groups, on a Ship of Fools”., Relying on God to guide their destiny. Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung introduced a standardized form of psychological vocabulary to the medical world, and contemporary man has distinguished himself by pursuing depression in its various guides as a clinical and scientific study for decades.

Today, studies connect depression and everything to sleep deprivation, opiate addiction, anorexia nervosa, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, and more. Prevention of depression and observing symptoms of depression, are now a key element of physician treatment advice. The dynamic of career choice has affected medical workers, doctors, and nurses as the practices began to take on occupational definition since the late 1600’s. Medicine  as a discipline has undergone radical reforms from it’s early days. The “physicking’ of another person began to take shape not just as a career for learned man, but as an occupation for educated men and individuals in search of a paying career. While the first doctors of this type were from the most elite classes of scholar and the most wealthy set of people in every culture, religion as  a passport to medical practice admitted religious elders to the treatment of others in more than one tribal civilization around the globe.

Many early teaching institutions centered around the scholastic training of doctors, priests, and teachers. The estimation of a physician was often ruled by his breadth of knowledge of medical studies and material of a religious nature. The indoctrination of a scholar in religion was thought to cement the ethics required to operate a medical practice and found the personal ethos necessary for treatment of other persons, conscious or unconscious. The access to the metaphysical world that many cultures connect with physical wellness allowed this transmutation of disciplines to coexist for many centuries.

The ethics associated with physicianship caused male scholars in the early 1700’s to pledge their scholastic faith in religion, as a going rates of “dues” cementing Christian ethics to the science of treating the bodies of other people. But as Calvinism, the teaching s of Martin Luther, and other religious doctrines took shape, the emergence of a new class of doctor purely to treat the physical malady emerged. The doctor as pure scientists emerged. Marie Curie and her husband were examples of this kind of doctor, who practiced their science without allowing religious culture to dominate their thinking. Doctors were thought of as esteemed members of the community, the equal of all but the highest echelons of the social order. Doctors are respected in every type and section of population where high level of education, practice of any differentiated culture, and necessary acknowledgement of the body of knowledge required and the commitment necessary confers a certain prestige.

In the succeeding centuries, academic studies have dominated the world of organized medicine. Then the business world took over mass medicine, and the world now has become a globalized client of large scale medical insurance companies. The patient is not always the client, as doctors usually are the ones that pharmaceutical companies look to for sponsorship of their treatment of new type of medications. It is the nursing profession, and nurses in particular, who deliver the front line of medical care and therapeutic attention to patients. It is the nurses in the medical world who are the ones that patients interact with the most.

But as the nursing career as a lifetime occupation has developed as a paying gig, the culture of acceptance and respect may not have been as evolved. The participation in medical profit for nurses has not followed along with that enjoyed by physicians working half the amount of time per week.  While nurses do the “heavy lifting” of patient care, their compensation is not commensurate with the time spent and sacrifices required of someone who has embarked on a nursing career. Nurses may work unpaid overtime, stay late, and do extra work, but nursing pay generally doesn’t always reflect this contribution. Ensuing generations of nurses will decide if more reform is in order.