Nursing Career a Predictor of Depression?

What does current research tell us about depression, nursing work performance, and occupational health conditions? That the indicators are present of workplace burnout, PTSD, common mental disorders,  and weight gain from occupational nursing stress. Studies conducted by Weller, et. all., (2008), Peterson et all, (2008), Jolivet et al., (2010),  HS Lin, (2010), Greiger, (2007), Dillman, (1987), Welsh, (2009) , and more have contributed specific research to the body of knowledge surrounding nursing careers, job stress,  and depression. Colleagues of  Yohai, (1987) , Gartner, (2010), and Langleib (2008), also have conducted research that indicated higher instances of wellness problems from the negative impact of nursing work. The research underscores the key premise of evaluating nursing occupations as a predictor of depression.

Does nursing as a career function as a predictor of depression? This above body of research and its combinant conclusions supports increased review of depression as an occupation covariable of nursing as a work choice. The response of nursing employers, hospital wellness initiators, and occupational nursing consultants should be impacted accordingly.

Nursing requires long hours, pain and suffering, complex pharmaceutical regimens and physician-ordered therapeutic treatments. And that’s just what the patients have to go through! Nurses as occupational workers must study and internalize a great deal of empirical knowledge to perform their jobs. Then they must absorb dozens of personality types, workplace idiosyncracies, and patient preferences. This must be done working long hours with little structured rest and relief.

But as studies show, nurses on the whole pay a price for the stress of their workday responsibilities. Burnout is common.  And employers should pay attention to where their training investment is going. Because almost 80% of the respondents report at least one health problem that impacts work productivity.  More muscular support and improved employer and healthcare schemes for treatment of a signally underreported problem such as this should be immediately complemented by companies via employee outreach.

Participants in the depression studies also reported other signifiers of unhappiness, burnout, and workplace difficulty. Anxiety, sleep problems, medication interventions, errors involving safety and medication indicate a workplace disaster waiting to happen. Wellness, it seems, is a professional responsibility for nurses. But it should be an ethical responsibility from employers toward their nursing workforce.  A large portion of the depressive-skewing group showed problems with obesity, lack of mental well-being, and a marked loss of productivity. These factors directly relate to lessened ability to manage workplace tasks and nursing duties. This is not the “Dark Ages” of pink collar employment anymore. Nursing retention spells better quality of care for patients in every scenario.  But as the research shows, wellness institutions, hospital medical-surgical wards, and global nursing workplaces all show a heightened coefficient of depression, as a nurse’s career lengthens.  And for nurses and nursing employers to (still) sponsor a working environment that promotes medication errors and unnecessary instigation of poor nursing performance is of grievous concern. For the corpus of the population looking to nurses for healthcare, having a depressed nurse doing nursing tasks and performing services for you is an alarming possibility, and yet now a statistical probability.

Nursing institutions themselves can most concretely change the elements causing some of the depressive orientation in nursing occupational experiences. Lessening workplace impairment should be a cooperative goal between all parties. Workers suffering from Depression, reporting health and coping issues, and committing errors are a risk. Nurses at risk for impaired work performance do not make positive role models.The validity of depressive indicators across all samples illustrates a higher demand for employer assistance programs.

High rates of depression can occur in every profession from stockbrokers to firemen. But nurses are the kind of specialized workers that should know enough to recognise stress and intervene before formal depression takes hold. And healthcare managers are far from immune to depression either. According to Welsh’s study of 150 nurses, the estimated prevalence rate for major depression is above 20%. Job satisfaction and burnout are also reported, but experts theorize that much more internalized stress is simmering under the surface.  The etiology of depression and the implications of depressive symptom incidence in nursing employees transcends mere lifestyle and cultural backgrounds.

   Total Depression Score (TDS) is the factor that rates the individual as a participant in the depression-growth dynamic sketched in research literature. Nursing associations throughout the United States actively participate in these studies to prevent growth of occupational difficulty and regression. The gender factor remains somewhat skewed, as an overwhelming share of aging nurses are female. In the North Carolina study, 91%, of the respondents were female. As male populations in nursing occupations changes, more data will be available with more updated research. 

Finding out more about what causes nursing career stress can illuminate the changes necessary to minimize wear and tear on the ‘ candy-striped collar ‘ industry. In a cross -sectional survey performed across 2500 random North Carolina nurse samples, only 47% bothered responding despite a dollar bill being provided! ( The Dillman strategy.) This shows a discomfort present when half of all nurses have to come to grips with how depression is affecting them.

For those considering the nursing profession, statistics and studies exploring depression as a coefficient of occupational nursing have something to say. There is no ” free-ride” in any career. In a nursing career, as studies and depression literature indicate, the cost of interaction and wear and tear of being a nurterer and a caregiver may have hidden social costs. Workplace characteristics play into this trend. The occupational risk of depression in the nursing field co-varies with employment type, age, level of nursing education attained, and communication elements between other nurses at the place of work.

Many of the above research authorities noted obesity as a depressive co-factor, and a synthesis of high BMI and other depressive indicators in stressed out  nurse candidates suffering burnout. . While the stigma of being overweight and the concept of career dissatisfaction is not unique to nursing professionals, the clusters of other signifiers attending incidence of career longevity in nursing, as well as the obesity factor, are. But other factors such as overcrowding of the patients in the healthcare environment,  and a lessened ability to communicate with other staff can also exacerbate depressive trends. Communication operates to solve many problems, and its absence in a nursing envirinment is a sure sign of workplace dysfunction. And the communication breakdown does not only limit profession nursing performance.  In cultures where many individuals are cued to conceal concerns about their own mental wellness, nurses are not as reliable for self-reporting symptoms of depression.

The current research offers new treatment options for depressed nurses and those experiencing job stress. Computers can offer Lcd-enabled counseling interventions and Internet–based cognitive  therapy technologies. Nursing assistance strategies for support should quantifiably emphasize more robust participation in these programs. Healthcare employers should introduce employees to their mobile and smartphone pathways to wellness.  Brands such as Mind street, E-couch, and Moodgym are examples.

Incidence of depression, depressive tendencies, and behaviors associated with depressive symptoms have been tracked in nursing sample groups of varying occupational nurses around the world. From field hospitals in theaters of war to metropolitan hospital wards, the research compiles statistics and observations that hint at a need for organized proactive response. One study of German nurses reflected the combination of lowered mental health rating, health problems, and lowered workplace productivity. Registrations of continuous and consistent depressive problems in nursing professionals should be resonant enough, by now, to incite employer-side support.

Studies and literature from varying institutions and scholars have been actively researching the extent to which depression correlates with nursing.  Medical-surgical nurses and intensive care nurses show a stronger inclination to self-reporting depression or depressive symptoms. These symptoms are correlations of somatic complaints (trouble sleeping), major life events, addictive habits, and signifiers of occupational stress.

The burden on nurses is to support the healthcare mission of physicians in hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, and field hospitals. Any type of nurse, it seems, may be subject to depression as his or her age rises and their career longevity extends. Yet nurses receive education and training about the downside of depression and its impact on well-being. The research begs the question ‘Why can’t nurses actively discount depression in their own lives, let alone offer impactful interventions to their patients?” Employers and wellness institutions should answer this query with a set of nursing occupational supports that reinforce the investment nurses have made not only for their own careers, but for optimum patient-side medical care experiences as well.

 

Drug Diversion in Nursing

One of the most serious challenges in the occupation of nursing is resisting the lure of addiction. But with the sheer availability of narcotics and opiods in nursing occupations, it is the casual use of pilfered ( and very strong,) pharmaceuticals that can springboard casual abuse into an unhealthy drug habit. Mood elevation and stress relief by the pill method can begin a nurse’s journay to drug dependency.
In the dark bolgia of drug addiction, factors such as affording drugs and the need to go to work can often prevent an overdose in the making. But in the case of career nurses, attendance, daily habits and the nursing lifestyle can feed a habit. Nurse may see evidence that another nurse is stealing meda, and using patient medications, without understanding what these behaviors mean.
Other nurses may shrug off strange behavior and mood swings that occur while otheers aee them doing unsupervised med pass duty. Nurses may not realize that state discipline records for regulatory infractions will follow them around their entire career.
Ideally nurses are caught and disciplined by management for incidents of drug diversions. But where oversight is slack and cost-cutting eradicates supervision, some nurses will slide down a slippery slope. If a nurse commits one act of drug diversion anf getsv away with it, they are likely to do it again.
Usually the casual abuser or recreational user of drugs stops short of a worsening a habit through exhausting their resources. But all a nurse has to do to feed their habit is to go to work. This fact doesn’t even begin to be able to address the difficulties that drug diversion makes for the patient.
People might expect nurses to know better. But when the only thing between a nurse and a drug overdose is a thinly spread staff and an unlocked medicine cart, problems will occur. Sometimes the nurses doing the drug diversion are on too-friendly terms with the individuals doing the closed circuit camera scrutiny
And many nurses fall victim to addiction by the dint of by having immediate access to powerful and clinically addictive nedications. Because the world of nursing is suffused with tasks consisting of interactions handling drugs. The temptation is impossible to ignore.
Once a drug habit forms, superhuman strength can’t make it stop
And nurses are only human.
About 80% of theft in retail or service professions is estimated to be internal. As value-based medical service models replace community benefit models, facilities that dispense drugs to patients become part of those crime statistics.
While police officers do not patrol nursing corridors and hospital wards, the goods are much more stringently restricted than folded sweaters or designer handbags. Electronic handprints and punch codes for med cart access cannot eliminate instances of drug diversion. Rather, unsupervised access to schedule one and two drugs such as narcotics enables any nurse to abuse their pharmaceutical access. Each nurse can elect not to exercise discretion in palming this or that pill or stealing an unwanted drug dosage.
Technical specifications and licensed nurse training are designed to prevent the mishandling of drugs and pills. But medications in the dosage sizes given to patients are usually a tiny pill or two. These are so small that drug diversion is not physically difficult. Such pills can be concealed in the mouth, hand, fingers, pocket, or even a hairband or cellphone cover.
Many nurses feel insulated from the threat of detection or capture due to the small community or office space that nurses inhabit. Nurses who filch medication from patient dosages may feel that the presence of other nurses in a small staff or closed community discounts the risk of getting caught.
There is an old saying that “familiarity breeds contempt.” Familiarity with the nursing homr or hospital workplace may orient a nurse to oversight shortcomings. Daily nurse work can bring forth feelings of antagonism against patients and causr anger and aggression against the facility owners or operators.
The angle of security cameras and the known infrequency of the facility to review the security footage may encourage drug diversion. Also, in a facility where narcotic record keeping MAR fidelity is poor, certain nurses may exploit these circumstances to pilfer patient medications.
In the nursing world, theft of drugs from patient dosages is called “drug diversion”. This practice indicates by its name how nurses behave as if they are following routine med passes. Drug diversion usually occurs in a busy hospital or care facility where oversight responsibilties are routinely overlooked.
Three case studies below illustrate how nurses can exploit vulnerabilities in hospital and long term care facility. But it is not only medical institutions that must be wary for drug diversion. Home health nurses operate in an environment even more probable to experience drug diversiin. The isolation and probable unlikelihood of detection creates a temptation some nurses may not be able to resist.

The legal liabilities that any nurse opens themselves up to, when caught committing drug diversion, are significant. The legal problems such nurses may create for a hospital group or long term care facility management corporation may be career-ending lawsuits.
Not every nurse steals medication. Some nurses are so wary of falling prey to drug use and drug diversion temptations that they make sure to dispense medications under closed circuit cameras and in the presence of another person or a group of nurses. But drug addicts are prone to secrecy and stealth to support their habit.
The possibility is also very high that some nurses are using employment in long term care facilities as a means to skim narcotics from their routine pharmaceutical distribution. If a nurse has a predisposition to emotional problems, job stress, or drug addiction, they may seek out second-rate facilities where security and supervision are slight.
(see the following article for case studies in Drug Diversion).

Handling Patient Visitors

Until you see the light in a patient’s eye, when their relatives come, how their face lights up, you just haven’t lived. The sum total of life is right there. The programmatic dynamic of parents raising children is reversed. The residents (parents) now received the care from visitors (children). It is a singular statement in every individual patient’s case what kind of care they get from family members. Just as people look the other way in a community when children are abused, a low-level nursing home gathers the neglected ones together. It takes a compassionate care nurse approach to make sure patients don’t feel neglected or overwhelmed.

Nurses in any pay range should report any examples of abuse to their nursing manager or as an anonymous complaint to the regional ombudsman. The County Health Facilities Director may also take an anonymous complaint alleging abuse. Nurses in acute care and skilled nursing should counseled to look out for signs and symptoms of abuse and should make an assessment in the chart accordingly. If patients should complain of missed medications, pain, unusual symptoms or worries concerning their care, the charge nurse should be notified.

The sliding scale of who and what family members come to visit is one nurses will become familiar with. Some visitors only show up once a year, on birthdays or anniversaries. Some people bring the whole family, and it can be overwhelming for a recovering patient or fragile resident. Sometimes visitors bring children or babies to encourage the older resident or family member to enjoy the family life absent in a skilled nursing facility or acute care hospital.

Nurses should make sure visitors should wash their hands before skin or physical contact with the patient, administer or deliver no medications or narcotics, and otherwise observe infection control best practices at all times in and around the patient‘s room and bathroom. Visitors and family, friends and relatives may not realize that resident of a skilled nursing facility or patients in acute care are extra vulnerable to viruses, colds, and other communicable diseases. Diabetic patients should be discouraged from overdoing it indulging on special “treats’ that can harm their health and change their blood sugar and cause a crisis.

Others come every weekend, and bring things or even help with the physical care and chores of a nursing home patient. usually, among nurses, this will reflect the status of a patient’s relationship to the visitor. Nurses should be vigilant if a patient shows a marked dejection after certain visitors come, or a tendency to depression after no visitors come. Such patients should be redirected to group activities or have the activities director contact relatives and suggest a family visit.

While financially the nurses know and differentiate between cash-pay residents and Medicaid or Medicare recipients, technically there should be no cognizance of the patient’s status when treating them or attending their bedside needs. health care should be available to everyone regardless of the ability to pay. By seeing the way the patients are treated, some nurses also differentiate between patients who receive visits and those who do not. This can be an unfair but persistent bias.

There is one simple rule for this: the family members and visitors of a nursing home patient will track neglect or have conversations with the patients where criticisms or reports might reach the ears of others. It is essential in some cases to keep frequent visitors’ parents (patients) well cared for, as the family member will appear at any time all day, or stay during significant parts of the day during one single shifts. That one family member will not see the effort the nurses put forth for the rest of the shift for the rest of the floor, but they can make enough noise t bother the managers and owners of the facility for months.

It is hard to watch a CNA or LVN favor a patient or set of patients whose relatives frequently visit, while the ones who need contact and pepping up most fall to the end of the range. One can watch a single nurse neglect a patient’s bed, person, or dignity outright, and hustle to the next room to cascade attention and caregiving on the least in need patient in the place. But this is what happens when nurse managers do not periodically refresh the training and motivation of nursing staff.

Any nursing home patient that has a visit from a relative or friend, social worker or investigator from the county health department, must have them sign in to the visitor’s register. there is usually a physician’s room or private area where an investigator can conduct I interviews or research charts. Additionally, medical records staff will make themselves available t assure any visitor they receive the most assistance possible.

The Changing Vision of Nursing

†Today nurses face challenges in the nursing world their predecessors never did. The slightest mistake can end up on YouTube. A crotchety patient might become a vexatious litigant. And worst of all, you could make a career ending mistake.

Newly licensed LVN nurses and RN nurses can safeguard their careers by following the best practices of their facility and the standard operating procedure of conventional nurses.For nurses to stay ethical and keep their noses clean, vigilance and propriety are necessary.

Good manners toward patients is the best practice. But for peers and other staff as well. Managers can appreciate the benefit of a new hire who is a good example. The spectrum of nursing careers can always include a nurse who is polished,perfect, and professional.

The stereotype of s nurse can be from a TV show or from examples people see over time. A paunchy, chain-smoking nurse tapping away at their phone is dividing their attention span before they clock in. The oversexed stereotype nurses who spends most of heir time socializing will often end up the subject of complaints.And nurses given supervisory roles when their performance is substandard will always suggest unfounded favorirism.

Additionally, nurses can look for good ways to stay motivated and meet personal goals. The stability that a career in nursing can offer provides financial security, as well as a few “chicken soup for the soul” experiences.These are often priceless insights into the human condition.

The payoffs of a career in nursing can be concrete and financial in nature or they can be as abstruse as angels dancing on the head of a pin.But each nursing professional needs to decide for themselves where monetary goals stop and vocational goals begin.

Many nurses find their vocation in helping people. Others ate looking for a way to migrate to another career, such as teaching or business. But the toll that care giving occupations take is becoming more difficult to ignore. Statistics on addiction, drug abuse, Petty crime and white-collar crime in the field of nursing is a well kept secret. Nurses often admit to feeding an addiction while on the job. Nurses fight smoking habits made deadly by their sheer casualness masking a dependence. Nurses can have delayed reactions to many of the experiences by they see and encounter PTSD later.

And some nurses worry about if there will be a nursing field in the future. Technical issues are turning the field of medicine into an adjunct of the insurance industry. How much nursing benefit can decades of dialysis provide? How can pacemakers and stints and implants improve the quality of life?

Decisions are being made every day to extend and lengthen life using equipment and materials foreign to the body’s natural makeup. The safety and longevity of many of these methods requires backups of conventional nurses to oversee and treat complex medical conditions.

This type of scientific leap forward will always need development and monitoring by medical professionals. And as long as people age and have health crises, a nurse ( or several hundred thousand) will be needed. Therefore the future of any nursing career is wide open.

 

Nursing for Sports Medicine

Nursing for sports medicine is a big movement in local and general practice health. The popularity of gyms, sports, and teenage and high school league sports, as well as childhood league sports can crowd a waiting room with single patient injuries or an entire team of them. The demands of the nursing challenge for these situations test nurses on their diagnostic skills, patient communication skills, and observational aptitude for patients who may not want their physical conditions commented upon or checked out.

The high school and college professional team sports system is rife with excesses that endanger student health. Education system nurses should brush up on sports medicine for concussions, artificial performance enhancements in teenager and young adults, and other wellness related issues for young athletes and sports participants of any age. Anorexia, alcohol abuse, drug abuse, and illegal substances may cloud behavior and vital signs.  Nurses should learn to read patients of all ages that might conceal or confuse physicians who may not factor in other elements in the patient diagnosis due to a lack of information.

Occupational sports medicine can have a broad range of employment opportunities. A television show where the contestants lose weight should have a physical wellness consultant to examine patients during extreme events and competitions. A recreational cruise should have a competent nurse to review case of passengers who have disabilities or health issue before they come on board.

Nurses should know about the ramification of high school sports and college sports, and recreational sports play and how much delivers patents in pain to the hospital on a regular basis. Sadly, people have a mind to ignore hat their doctor tells them and play anyway. Nurse should be rote in the conditions of sports related concussions, trauma, bruising, bone breaks and sprains, muscle tears and the incidence and symptoms for a diagnosis of concussion.

Nurses for sports medicine might branch off after years of general health practitioner employment or LVN work in the treatment of sports-related concussions and other sports injuries. In children and teenage athletes, there is the potential for serious long-term outcomes, such as brain damage, dementia and other risks such as substance abuse after the injury or trauma. Weekend athletes are prone to even more injury because they are likely out of condition or aging, not warmed up or not wearing suitable support equipment.

Emergency rooms can be filled with skateboard kids, bikers, roller skaters and surfers who refuse to wear proper headgear, pads, knee guards, etc. Participating in sports activities in the wrong time and place can also result in physicial injury. Sports concussions have a window of serious concern following immediate hospitalization where the patient must be scrutinized for brain damage, motor neuron fluctuations, synapse irregularity, or other disorders of the brain.

The competent sports medicine nurse will be able to diagnose and define sports-related concussions and the seriousness of the and the sports in which they are most often found. Family friends, and the patient (and coach) will want to know the immediate and long-term symptoms of bone breaks, fractures, and sports-related concussions. Nurses can take the opportunity in seminars and clinicals to discuss expert recommendations for preventing and managing sports-related concussions, to pass onto students and patients.

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