Nursing Career a Predictor of Depression?

What does current research tell us about depression, nursing work performance, and occupational health conditions? That the indicators are present of workplace burnout, PTSD, common mental disorders,  and weight gain from occupational nursing stress. Studies conducted by Weller, et. all., (2008), Peterson et all, (2008), Jolivet et al., (2010),  HS Lin, (2010), Greiger, (2007), Dillman, (1987), Welsh, (2009) , and more have contributed specific research to the body of knowledge surrounding nursing careers, job stress,  and depression. Colleagues of  Yohai, (1987) , Gartner, (2010), and Langleib (2008), also have conducted research that indicated higher instances of wellness problems from the negative impact of nursing work. The research underscores the key premise of evaluating nursing occupations as a predictor of depression.

Does nursing as a career function as a predictor of depression? This above body of research and its combinant conclusions supports increased review of depression as an occupation covariable of nursing as a work choice. The response of nursing employers, hospital wellness initiators, and occupational nursing consultants should be impacted accordingly.

Nursing requires long hours, pain and suffering, complex pharmaceutical regimens and physician-ordered therapeutic treatments. And that’s just what the patients have to go through! Nurses as occupational workers must study and internalize a great deal of empirical knowledge to perform their jobs. Then they must absorb dozens of personality types, workplace idiosyncracies, and patient preferences. This must be done working long hours with little structured rest and relief.

But as studies show, nurses on the whole pay a price for the stress of their workday responsibilities. Burnout is common.  And employers should pay attention to where their training investment is going. Because almost 80% of the respondents report at least one health problem that impacts work productivity.  More muscular support and improved employer and healthcare schemes for treatment of a signally underreported problem such as this should be immediately complemented by companies via employee outreach.

Participants in the depression studies also reported other signifiers of unhappiness, burnout, and workplace difficulty. Anxiety, sleep problems, medication interventions, errors involving safety and medication indicate a workplace disaster waiting to happen. Wellness, it seems, is a professional responsibility for nurses. But it should be an ethical responsibility from employers toward their nursing workforce.  A large portion of the depressive-skewing group showed problems with obesity, lack of mental well-being, and a marked loss of productivity. These factors directly relate to lessened ability to manage workplace tasks and nursing duties. This is not the “Dark Ages” of pink collar employment anymore. Nursing retention spells better quality of care for patients in every scenario.  But as the research shows, wellness institutions, hospital medical-surgical wards, and global nursing workplaces all show a heightened coefficient of depression, as a nurse’s career lengthens.  And for nurses and nursing employers to (still) sponsor a working environment that promotes medication errors and unnecessary instigation of poor nursing performance is of grievous concern. For the corpus of the population looking to nurses for healthcare, having a depressed nurse doing nursing tasks and performing services for you is an alarming possibility, and yet now a statistical probability.

Nursing institutions themselves can most concretely change the elements causing some of the depressive orientation in nursing occupational experiences. Lessening workplace impairment should be a cooperative goal between all parties. Workers suffering from Depression, reporting health and coping issues, and committing errors are a risk. Nurses at risk for impaired work performance do not make positive role models.The validity of depressive indicators across all samples illustrates a higher demand for employer assistance programs.

High rates of depression can occur in every profession from stockbrokers to firemen. But nurses are the kind of specialized workers that should know enough to recognise stress and intervene before formal depression takes hold. And healthcare managers are far from immune to depression either. According to Welsh’s study of 150 nurses, the estimated prevalence rate for major depression is above 20%. Job satisfaction and burnout are also reported, but experts theorize that much more internalized stress is simmering under the surface.  The etiology of depression and the implications of depressive symptom incidence in nursing employees transcends mere lifestyle and cultural backgrounds.

   Total Depression Score (TDS) is the factor that rates the individual as a participant in the depression-growth dynamic sketched in research literature. Nursing associations throughout the United States actively participate in these studies to prevent growth of occupational difficulty and regression. The gender factor remains somewhat skewed, as an overwhelming share of aging nurses are female. In the North Carolina study, 91%, of the respondents were female. As male populations in nursing occupations changes, more data will be available with more updated research. 

Finding out more about what causes nursing career stress can illuminate the changes necessary to minimize wear and tear on the ‘ candy-striped collar ‘ industry. In a cross -sectional survey performed across 2500 random North Carolina nurse samples, only 47% bothered responding despite a dollar bill being provided! ( The Dillman strategy.) This shows a discomfort present when half of all nurses have to come to grips with how depression is affecting them.

For those considering the nursing profession, statistics and studies exploring depression as a coefficient of occupational nursing have something to say. There is no ” free-ride” in any career. In a nursing career, as studies and depression literature indicate, the cost of interaction and wear and tear of being a nurterer and a caregiver may have hidden social costs. Workplace characteristics play into this trend. The occupational risk of depression in the nursing field co-varies with employment type, age, level of nursing education attained, and communication elements between other nurses at the place of work.

Many of the above research authorities noted obesity as a depressive co-factor, and a synthesis of high BMI and other depressive indicators in stressed out  nurse candidates suffering burnout. . While the stigma of being overweight and the concept of career dissatisfaction is not unique to nursing professionals, the clusters of other signifiers attending incidence of career longevity in nursing, as well as the obesity factor, are. But other factors such as overcrowding of the patients in the healthcare environment,  and a lessened ability to communicate with other staff can also exacerbate depressive trends. Communication operates to solve many problems, and its absence in a nursing envirinment is a sure sign of workplace dysfunction. And the communication breakdown does not only limit profession nursing performance.  In cultures where many individuals are cued to conceal concerns about their own mental wellness, nurses are not as reliable for self-reporting symptoms of depression.

The current research offers new treatment options for depressed nurses and those experiencing job stress. Computers can offer Lcd-enabled counseling interventions and Internet–based cognitive  therapy technologies. Nursing assistance strategies for support should quantifiably emphasize more robust participation in these programs. Healthcare employers should introduce employees to their mobile and smartphone pathways to wellness.  Brands such as Mind street, E-couch, and Moodgym are examples.

Incidence of depression, depressive tendencies, and behaviors associated with depressive symptoms have been tracked in nursing sample groups of varying occupational nurses around the world. From field hospitals in theaters of war to metropolitan hospital wards, the research compiles statistics and observations that hint at a need for organized proactive response. One study of German nurses reflected the combination of lowered mental health rating, health problems, and lowered workplace productivity. Registrations of continuous and consistent depressive problems in nursing professionals should be resonant enough, by now, to incite employer-side support.

Studies and literature from varying institutions and scholars have been actively researching the extent to which depression correlates with nursing.  Medical-surgical nurses and intensive care nurses show a stronger inclination to self-reporting depression or depressive symptoms. These symptoms are correlations of somatic complaints (trouble sleeping), major life events, addictive habits, and signifiers of occupational stress.

The burden on nurses is to support the healthcare mission of physicians in hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, and field hospitals. Any type of nurse, it seems, may be subject to depression as his or her age rises and their career longevity extends. Yet nurses receive education and training about the downside of depression and its impact on well-being. The research begs the question ‘Why can’t nurses actively discount depression in their own lives, let alone offer impactful interventions to their patients?” Employers and wellness institutions should answer this query with a set of nursing occupational supports that reinforce the investment nurses have made not only for their own careers, but for optimum patient-side medical care experiences as well.

 

Drug Diversion Case Studies

The previous article on drug diversion explored the ways in which professionals in the nursing occupation respond to temptation by stealing medication from patients. This occurs when environmental security in a hospital, nursing home, or home health situation is not sufficient to detect and/or prevent this crime. Drug diversion is doubly dangerous because in some cases the patient suffers. The therapeutic value designed into the patients’ care plan is degraded severely by drug diversion.
Nurses who pocket or take medications cheat their patients of needed pharmaceuticals. But the nurses may also succumb to the near-universal lure of addictive pill-taking behaviors that impair their ability to think clearly and conduct their nursing activities responsibly. Opiate addiction is a global problem, and nursing can be a gateway career for addicts.
Drug diversion occurs when a nurse makes a decision to go against his or her better judgment. When this happens, day to day patient care is compromised. Since single-staff nursing plans don’t allow for auditing, the problem of pilfered medications will get much worse before it gets any better. Detection is the first method of arresting drug diversion. Symptoms of missed medications may blend with the patient’s pain spikes or be termed mood swings by distracted nursing staff.
Patients who vocalize extra pain or think that the nurse missed a pill may be disregarded.
Nurses who practice drug diversion may be in a position to target patients that nurses dislike and have no sympathy for. It may be some time before patient complaints are heeded and med counts correlated. And many nurses may move on before any official action can be taken.
Official complaints are the second step to take action against suspected drug diversion. Yet an official investigation by state or local nursing agencies is cumbersome and time consuming. And nursing homes go to great lengths to cover up their internal problems. When faced with legal liabilities a hospital may nullify patient lab reports or other evidence the patient’s care was impaired.
In instances when drug diversion takes place in home health scenarios, the abuse may never be discovered. The privacy and isolation of a home health environment are ideal elements for a nurse planning drug diversion. In any case, the patient will suffer. And the family members may never know why the patient is struggling for relief.
The third method to control drug diversion is peer policing. Nurses must take a stand from inside their community to cite and counsel nurses guilty of this crime. Leaders on every nursing staff should set an example of how to intervene and/or report drug diversion suspicions. Nurses who witness palmed medications should document what they see, and report the incident to the human resources director or the State Nursing Board. Anonymous complaints are allowed.
The most likely medication targeted by nurses for drug diversion is narcotics, painkillers, and opioids. These medications can alter mood and hinder feeling “down” effectively. Nurses practicing drug diversion are in fact trying to medicate themselves.
These pharmaceuticals are not only targeted for personal use. Drugs like Fentanyl, Dilaudid, Vicodin, Morphine, and others are highly marketable among addicts. Nurses may use pilfered drugs as currency among junkies with access to illegal street drugs. When a nurse is desperate enough for cash, students looking to maintain a high grade point average are good cash customers for diverted drugs. Students who reject shady contacts and promote a drug-free persona can utilize their nurse contact on the sly for ‘lifestyle enhancements’.
Case Study #1
Valery Gomez is an LVN working 4 days a week at a metropolitan hospital with high patient turnover. Valery started working six months and ago nursing is her first job. Her husband prefers her to have weekends off and her two children are taken care of on the days she works by her husband’s mother and family. Valery Gomez usually works the morning day shift.
Although initially Valery is bright, funny, and congenial, lately her personality when dealing with patients has changed. After twelve months on the job her nursing skills have not improved. Among the nurses hired in tandem with her, most have risen to supervisor or specialized posts. Valery’s peers have graduated to more complex work responsibilities,
It has been observed by the nurses on staff that Valery is often ” sitting doing nothing” and shoulders little of the actual individual tasks requied of desk nurses, and her charting and case load is usually poor or unfinished.
Lately several incidents with patients and Valery have brought unwelcome scrutiny to her employer from the County Health Department. The Ombudsman has received complaints about problems with Valery’s patient, problems that remain unresolved despite past counseling. Valery shows no remorse for causing great difficulty for other nurses and extreme physical stress to some of her patients.
Valery rarely lends a hand to any other nurses. She exhibits fits of temper when meds are requested and denys patients their needed painkillers without explanation. Valery makes a practice of hanging around the desk when the med-cart is adjacent and unattended. Valery recently has requested changes to her work assignments to shifts where the majority of staff wre gone.
While Valery made comments initially that she prefers a schedule with weekends free, now Valery has requested work on Saturday and Sunday. This is when most of the staff are gone. One of the patients, Nancy Lee, remarks that in private conversation Valery always told her that Valery’s husband wants her free on the weekends to entertain and care for the children.
Nancy Lee is a patient who recieves very heavy pain medication for multiple conditions. Nancy Lee has documented painful needle sticks from Valery. The Nursing Director has counseled Valery about not delaying Nancy’s med pass routine unnecessarily. The D.O.N. has repeatedly received complaints of Valery denying Nancy Lee her needed medication.
Valery alone of the many med-pass nurses resists the instruction to inform Nancy Lee how many Fentanyl she has left on her pain management precription. Mancy Lee has made complaints to the State Nursing Board about the matter.The local authorities have substantiated Nancy’s complaints.
Nancy Lee is articulate, alert, and ambulatory. She notices that paperwork in her chart written by Valery is inaccurate and incrimminating documentation concerning incidents with Valery has been removed. Nancy Lee hears from other nurses that Valery has refused to chart for them on occasion and also has refused to cooperate with requests from other nurses to perform tasks for them while they do her work.
Nancy Lee steps outside her roomn one day and observes that Valery Gomez visits the trash room frequently. Since the housekeeping staff normally do this, Nancy wonders why Valery alone of all the nurses disappears from the nursing desk floor while on duty. In the past, when Valery was Nancy’s nurse strange pills would be found in the floor. Nancy wonders why Valery avoids the closed circuit camera view so often.
In the past, Nancy Lee has noticed that many of the CNA staff hide in the supply room or the trash room and text to friends, play video games, or talk and use their cellphones. Nancy feels strobgly that Valery Gomez has been pilfering and experimenting with pain medications intended for the patients.
Nancy feels that Valery watches for opportunities to steal, hide, and ingest patient medication while on the job. Nancy has noticed that
Valery has lost weight and taken an interest in a handsome young nurse new to the facility. Nancy sees Valery drift through the weekend avoiding family responsibilities.
Suddenly it is found and told to Nancy that repeated impropriety concerning her pain medication has caused the med cart run out many months in a row. The pharmacy cannot account for the errors.

Nancy wants the D.O. N. to order a drug test for Valery after a weekend where the nurse repeatedly goes into the trash closet. Nancy sees Valery glaze over while another nurse is calling her name. Nancy sees a pill hit the ground after Valery comes out of the trash closet. When the good looking male nurse calls in sick, Nancy notices that Valery loses all interest in her work, snapping at peopke and gruffly answering the phone.
Does Nancy have the right to do this? How should the D.O.N. respond? How should the other nurses at the facility act at this time? Who should act, what should they do, and when does this become an investigative problem for police? How do the three methods to limit drug diversion, as outlined above, operate here?
Case Study #2
In a large hospital near Los Angeles, one of the patients in the SNF Alice. has noticed something disturbing. In the morning at 5:45 a.m. every day moans and screams start rising from the patients in the other rooms. The nurses tell this patient that many of the other patients are addicts who start yelling for their opiates and pain drugs too early. The nurses say that if they start giving out the pain medication for other patients too early, the next day the same thing will happen again and the patients will use up all their pain medication too early. The patient observes that there are no general administrator on duty at this time of the day.
After three months,the same thing happens very day. The patient notices how the exact same staff work the 11 to 7 a.m. shift daily even though alternates regularly appear on the other two shifts. Alice notices the call lights and alarm sounds series at this time, unlike at any other time, are often allowed to build and be ignored. The charge nurse responsibilities are shared beteeen a close knit group of nurses.
Soon the patient believes that the hospital does not know anything about how bad this problem seems. After months of different patients coming in and out the sane phenomena occur. On the day and afternoon shift the moans and screams do not recur as they during the “dawn patrol”.

Over time the patient fears that the hospital has suppressed recording this issue. Alice thinks that these SNF patients acting in this manner and reporting pain is being concealed and not documented so that their staffng acuity will not shift. This appears to be a cost cutting measure administered when no officials, visitors, or ancillary hospital staff can witness the outcry at dawn.

What questions should the hospital adminstrators be asking about why so many patients in the SNF are demonstrating this scale of pain indicators without a investigation or compassionate care response? What responsibilities does the facility have to monitor quality of care?

PICC Line Administration Facts

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A variety of skills are brought to bear on a daily multiple patient regimen, but nurses may need some more than others at critical junctures in the patient’s care plan. The most valuable skill a nurse can get trained on is opening a pick line in a patient. This is often referred to as finding a vein, or setting up a PICC line. The necessity for keeping the “pick” line in for every patient is a requirement for institutionalized healthcare practices and sound care plan advice.

The tap-in should be clean and free from swelling, tension, stiffness,’and/or causing discomfort for the patient. Blood, water, liquid of any type collecting under the dressing should be examined at once. Once affixed, tapes should be annotated with the date of line-in for future reference. Finding peripheral lines in veins must accord with circulatory norms. Nurses cannot begin to rely on easy veins and many long-term patients will need the best pick line insertion techniques when their pick line sites will begin to dry up.

The PICC line is not an easy skill to master. Connecting with the Superior Vena Cava is essential, and thus not just “any” vein can be used. In long term patients the proper veins ”hide” or “become smarter”, evading nurse’s or a technician’s search. This the need for mechanized equipment to find the proper vein is often required. A sonogram machine can be used to generate a visualization of the vein location for technical insertion point.

Nurses categorically check the line on every patient they have in their care roster, whether they are on IV drugs or not. Infection can start if a pick line is left in for too long. This is due to the procedural adaptation in every patient’s medical status whereby IV drug therapy becomes necessary. Grooming a patient’s line and monitoring its condition must be done at all times. Re-insertion of the line must be performed at once if problems arise.

Yet time and again the need for a re-insertion of a patient’s line can shed light on just how few nurses on the ward, if any, can find a vein and insert the pick line in a manner which will be sustained over a number of days. Patients may pull the line out, loosen it, or even worse, injure themselves. Nurse should explain to patients why they need to be conscientious about their line and work towards not straining it or causing tears at the skin’s opening.

This is a serious problem and could cause further delays and inefficiencies in nursing care down the line. Hunting through various staff wards for a nurse who can insert a pick line without the assistance of a sonogram is a seriocomic statement of what training nurses are expected to have versus what the actually bring to the job each day. Nurses should note in their charts the condition if each pick line and notify patient services if additional assistance is required.

Of course the heplock can always be used but that required a clean set of tubes every 72 hours and a clean insertion site. Many patients do not have the skin integrity or the vein strength for this. For this reason the PICC line is favored. To avoid delay in adminitrating an ordered dosage or maintenance regimen of material, make sure the entire case history of the patients dermal integrity is reviewed before any perforation is commenced.

Chronic Pain Syndrome

A severely challenging condition threatening patients today is chronic pain syndrome. This occurs when various parts of the body and mind come together is a constantly recurring cycle of pain throughout the body. When it occurs, chronic pain syndrome can also affect certain areas of the body after they have been injured, wounded, or operated upon. The pain can be general or it may be concentrated, such as in the temples, legs, hands, or chest and back. A skilled physician experienced in observing chronic pain syndrome can assign this diagnosis and track the symptoms in their quality, severity, and consistency.
The hard part about treating chronic pain syndrome is that to many people it sounds like the typical complaining any patient might do. But the persistence of this kind of pain, its general presence, and the way it avoids being treated by drugstore or over-the-counter painkillers is one clue that chronic pain syndrome is present. Another trait of chronic pain syndrome is that it can subsume after a burst of general health, but then after a period the overall condition can suffer. The patient’s health will weaken and then the chronic pain syndrome can re-emerge when the patient’s overall sense of well-being or general health correspondingly weakens.
For reasons such as these, people in the main confuse chronic pain syndrome with “getting run down”. People in good health maintain regular cycles of endorphins and a balance of hormone. But depression and chronic pain sufferers actually alter the chemicals in their body and brain over a period of time when their behavior alters. Self-injury and accidents can occur as patients become more clumsy and careless dealing with another day in pain. Their impulses to deal with their stress and pain do not take healthy roads and the results can be seen in the way people stop taking care of themselves.
But with chronic pain syndrome, damaged nerves can keep up live pain enactions upon the central nervous system and mind long after the flesh and other damaged or diseased areas have been repaired. The axons of neurons keep firing and “informing” the brain of pain that in fact is no longer being inflicted. The patient feels pressure and the slightest sensation with a magnification that few nurses initially can credit. Just getting dressed, driving, and/or working activities can be physically and mentally impossible for some patients with chronic pain syndrome.
This can affect patients recovering from a long disease, suffering from other conditions at the same time, or suffering from chronic pain as a complication of other conditions, wounds, or diseases of the body. The physical treatment of the chronic pain syndrome also involves attention paid to the creative fulfillment, intellectual stimulation, connection to nature and energetic physical endeavors of the patient to put balance back into their routine. But many patients suffering from chronic pain syndrome are not ready for these interventions yet.
Not by medication alone can chronic pain syndrome be treated. And in some cases, patients will report as few as a two to three hours a day or even in one week when they can handle activities such as writing, reading, reviewing accounts, discussing business affairs, or even concentrating on complex ideas or complicated matters. The patient recognizes this loss even as they battle it being lost. The mental attitude of a chronic pain syndrome patient cannot convert chronic pain into nothingness, but a sharpened perspective and a better-motivated alertness to the positive side of things can assist in keeping the chronic pain from controlling and ruining one’s life.
Nurses taking care of patients with chronic pain syndrome will have some difficulty moving them out of a mode of lethargy and into a spirit of motivated exercise. Movement is a key way to change the ingrained tendencies toward “moping” and dwelling on the pain that chronic pain syndrome involves. Patients such as this need to be urged to get out once in a while, make lists of things they like to do and schedule them. Sufferers of chronic pain syndrome must take an active role in combating the wear and tear of the disease. The behavioral aspect of their choices can overtake their neurobiological symptoms.
Chronic pain patients, especially the elderly, develop patterns of coping with their pain that may not seem helpful to outsiders. But survivors of wounds, attacks, diseases, and other complicated life events will nurse problematic chronic pain conditions for the rest of their lives. This is in contrast to the acute care approach to many painful issues in the otherwise straightforward assistance that urgent care patients receive. But long-term care and elderly patients will usually have an onset of chronic pain syndrome with the severely worsening of arthritis, osteoarthritis, sciatica, and back pain.
Unfortunately, not a lot of physicians train or prepare their patients on how to deal with chronic pain syndrome psychologically. Pharmaceutically the plan of care can treat the pain as it occurs or worsens. But the ongoing struggle with the challenges of chronic pain syndrome, complex and long standing, are unique to the individual patient in many cases. Because many chronic pain sufferers avoid public places, noise, chaotic events like concerts or music clubs, and unpredictable and physically demanding environments, they develop a coping system of this avoidance and they become viewed as “shut-ins”. The outsider observes the behavior of avoidance and misses the fact that there is reason and a pattern of behavior behind it. The patient is just trying to avoiding trigger situations where their chronic pain can be set off.
Nurses can keep an eye on their chronic pain syndrome patients and counsel them about their health. Nurses and case managers can provide helpful advice about how to spend their free time as well as enhance the attention paid to details other than their vital statistics and medication schedules. Such patients may be suffering from depression because of their inability to deal with their chronic pain syndrome. Nurses spend a good deal of time talking with patients. They hear how the patients speak of themselves. These patients may need to learn to interrupt negative belief systems, they may need encouragement and praise, and they may need to find ways to reward themselves and learn new ways of spending their time.
Sufferers of chronic pain may give out signals that friends and relatives do not understand. And chronic pain sufferers do not like to advertise how much pain they are in. They can mask their problems with overeating, Internet surfing, “quick-hit fixes” like smoking, video games, light movies or soft drinks. These activities can hijack feelings of serious ongoing pain in extremities, the temples , in the lower back or neck, et cetera. Sufferers of chronic pain may not understand that they have a serious problem, and may simply put their issues down to emotional problems or being unsuccessful at functioning to a higher standard.
Patients dealing with chronic pain syndrome will plot ways to avoid dealings with their pain by avoiding exercise or going out, to compare themselves unfavorably with others. They know their health is in decline, they just may not understand why. Chronic pain victims will isolate themselves and often appear erratic and eccentric. Chronic pain sufferers can cope with sudden and uncontrollable pain by stomping their feet,(to displace nerve pain) drinking, (to numb the nerve pain) watching TV, (for distraction), playing music (to give the pain white noise to play against) , and/or driving too fast, (because they can’t control the pain in their limbs and leg nerves). Or, when suffering from unpredictable intensities of chronic pain patients may cancel appointments and social engagements because they can’t anticipate when the pain will peak.
The solution to a problem with chronic pain is to concoct a care plan with many moving parts . This plan then becomes the patient’s responsibility to keep those moving parts improving and going, growing and becoming better. These are significant goals that can alter the quality of life for sufferers of chronic pain syndrome. The many motifs in a successful care plan for chronic pain syndrome are simply a roadmap to access all the information involved and plot a best case scenario. A nurse can assist any patient in the parts of the care plan they feel most comfortable with. Sometimes just visualizing a better frame of mind or achieving small goals can be helpful to the health of the patient. Nurses should refer their patients showing symptoms to chronic nerve pain specialists, or care plan managers.

Nursing Study Guide: Depression

One of the biggest challenges facing the adult nurturing and caregiving patient populations is depression.
Careers and unemployment can both cause toxic stress in some people. Without positive well-being, a corrosive anxiety builds. Negativity can wind itself into behavior and thinking patterns.
The nurse in the Emergency Room and the nurse in the long term care facility will see depression at work in patients. And especially the home health nurse will see private pain and suffering on the part of their primary charges. Each kind of nurse will have to develop a technique for intake, analysis, interaction and treatment with a patient diagnosed with depression.

No longer is depression a disorder without a face. Tragedies in almost every state have appeared in bold face type. As a workplace hazard, across the United States,  an incident of violence or self-harm,  involving a depressed and mentally disordered person increases every day.

Nurse intake workers must carefully evaluate patients prone to addictive habits such as smoking, drinking, abuse of controlled substances, or unchararacreristic or destructive behavior.

The use of chemical substances and pharmaceuticals the treatment of depression has given rise to is a concern for many socially oriented activist groups and health maintenance organizations.

A variety  of caregiving professions, such as nurses, counselors, physicians, specialty providers, and treatment experts have been wrestling with the health problem that depression poses for centuries.
Today depression problems can cause an airline captain to plummet his plane and its passengers to their deaths. The depressed conductor of a rail train can lose focus and wreck the train cars, throwing everyone aboard off the track to injury or worse. Depression and other mental health issues are now squarely on the public eye.

First described in the literature of Freud as a “malaise”, postJungian medical practitioners regularly recognized symptoms of the disorder as far back as the early 1900’s. What became a cocktail party anecdote at first began to gain steam in the medical community. By the time World War One, military doctors were inventing wartime medications to combat this strange phenomenon.

Depression can present similarly in persons by unusual or destructive behavior, excessive alcohol and drug use, mood swings, or chemical imbalances in the blood. Lab tests can screen for these indicators,. which is why Emergency Room admissions will usually have a toxicity panel and blood gas analysis ordered before key triage decisions are made

It is the numbing of depressive individuals’ “inner world” that leads to an addiction to sleeping pills, diet pills, pain pills. and other abuses of limited- schedule prescriptipn medication.

Also, certain incidences of depression syndromes can affect people experiencing a significant life event. PTSD survivors survive traumatic combat ecperiences even though all persons with PTSD did not share the same exact event.

Depression can be suffered among persons who live similar but disparate lives. Today, patients can employ various strategies and methods to combat depression and the behaviors it exacurbates and the condition it worsens.

The patient groups and subgroups, as well as pools of invidividuals who have shared a significant life event, can fall into varying levels of depressive behavior.

People who survived the 9/11 terrorist attack on New York, for example, may have experienced a kind of depression called “survivor’s guilt.” Sufferers of this and many other types of depression are urged tovtalk to support groups and seek treatment from a licensed and qualified healthcare provider.

Nurses will often observe the symptoms of depression in both long-term and acute-care patients. In many cases, an acute-care life event such as a stroke, a heart attack, or a seizure might be triggered from conditions linked to depression.
The patient’s health and safety are paramount at all times. High blood pressure, drinking, drug abuse, atypical personality traits and characteristics of self harm might signal the presence of a depressive person or a depression disorder. Information regarding past treatments of depression be available in the medical chart.
The professional and care plan interventions for depression also can be psychological. A trained medical professional can analyze the patient’s history and recommend coping strategies. Together with a psychologist, the patient can try exercises aimed at breaking down the supporting anxieties of the depressive condition.
One thing a medical expert on treating depression will do is examine what circumstances or scenarios trigger the patient’s depression. Gaining perspective on one’s life and using physical and mental energy can give a patient a more level understanding of exactly a threat really is.
Mental health professionals have worked hard to remove the stigma of depression.Encouraging a patientbto get treatment is a much more effectice intervention.
After a treatment referral is done, outreach to a qualified provider is made. This depressopn therapist can devise techniques that eliminate the focus on negative patterns, self-destructive behavior, and developing a sad or poor attitude that can lead to a negative spiral.

At this point ending isolation and developing resources to prevent downswings in mood is a key dual goal. Gaining control of flexibility and less destruction to extremes can allow a person with depressive tendencies to steer themselves away from harmful behavior and towards goal-centric future rewards.

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