Nurse Training Issues

Nurses need to be trained to treat patients and all their needs, as required. Nurses cannot pick and choose which chores they need to do on which patient, nor do they get to arrange the timeframe that suits them best. Often a case load of needy patients means that the nurse will be juggling various needy patients as well as performing paperwork responsibilities, charting, and intaking new patients at the same time. Not to mention answering the phone and dealing with walk-in clients.

Nurses must be ready to say “yes” to every task. They may be reassigned to other wards or areas as needed. Nurses must groom their computer and Internet research skills to match today’s technological advances. There will be slow days and there will fast days, but nurses are responsible for treating all patients at the highest level of care no matter what their time limitations are.

For example, in a clinical care situation in training, a nurse might have to alter the setting on a EKG machine or test out various pharmaceutical applications on a patient to achieve the best result for lowered blood pressure. But the time and physical availability for results and communications in real time versus training environment may not match the situation reality. Phones on the ward training, another nurse needing help, or a new admission coming onto the scene may distract a nurse.

Nursing students have a training experience that is simple cases of ongoing treatment cases. but in reality medical care plans are much more complex. Patients may be resistant to treatment or not observant of dietary restrictions or their rest order as given by the physician. Nurses on the job often give qualified objections because they have not had a chance to speak with the doctor before issuing pain or treatment medications to a patient they have never seen before. Patents are likewise alarmed they are not seen or given a consultation before a dosage regiment is instituted.

Nurses are the key communicators in this scenario. Nurses in this instance carry more responsibility to review both the patient set of criteria and the data involved with possible side effects of a drug. They must weight this information against the patient’s benefit, versus the entire set of pharmaceuticals being introduced to the patent’s bloodstream. Often a nurse can spot a contraindication before anyone else, and the thrust is upon them to do so. Nurse must also counsel the patient and asses them psychologically at all time. When shifts change, nurses must convey both verbally and in writing the most timely changes in patient assessment to the next charge nurse. These must be done in accurate medical terminology in a transparent style.

Is the patient a physical threat to themselves or others? Is the effect of any change or restriction in medication or privileges affecting them negatively? Are they speaking to themselves or others in a manner that shows a change in self esteem or motivation to heal? Some patients may create incidences of panic disorder and need to be housed a negative ion chamber. A psychological evaluation referral is appropriate at this time. They may try to not take their medication, create obstacles to treatment, or become even more ill. Student nurse skills must adapt and grow to meet the situation.

It is hard to train a nurse for the variety of challenges and issues that come up for their patients in this kind of scenario. Occasionally physicians will be flexible and change to the individual care plan will be made. It is vital to the medical outcome that these circumstances be communicated to the next nurses and on-call physicians. Being able to perform simple tasks like recording dosages and medical administration while balancing management of multiple patients can get tricky.

Nursing Study Guide: Depression

One of the biggest challenges facing the adult nurturing and caregiving patient populations is depression.
Careers and unemployment can both cause toxic stress in some people. Without positive well-being, a corrosive anxiety builds. Negativity can wind itself into behavior and thinking patterns.
The nurse in the Emergency Room and the nurse in the long term care facility will see depression at work in patients. And especially the home health nurse will see private pain and suffering on the part of their primary charges. Each kind of nurse will have to develop a technique for intake, analysis, interaction and treatment with a patient diagnosed with depression.

No longer is depression a disorder without a face. Tragedies in almost every state have appeared in bold face type. As a workplace hazard, across the United States,  an incident of violence or self-harm,  involving a depressed and mentally disordered person increases every day.

Nurse intake workers must carefully evaluate patients prone to addictive habits such as smoking, drinking, abuse of controlled substances, or unchararacreristic or destructive behavior.

The use of chemical substances and pharmaceuticals the treatment of depression has given rise to is a concern for many socially oriented activist groups and health maintenance organizations.

A variety  of caregiving professions, such as nurses, counselors, physicians, specialty providers, and treatment experts have been wrestling with the health problem that depression poses for centuries.
Today depression problems can cause an airline captain to plummet his plane and its passengers to their deaths. The depressed conductor of a rail train can lose focus and wreck the train cars, throwing everyone aboard off the track to injury or worse. Depression and other mental health issues are now squarely on the public eye.

First described in the literature of Freud as a “malaise”, postJungian medical practitioners regularly recognized symptoms of the disorder as far back as the early 1900’s. What became a cocktail party anecdote at first began to gain steam in the medical community. By the time World War One, military doctors were inventing wartime medications to combat this strange phenomenon.

Depression can present similarly in persons by unusual or destructive behavior, excessive alcohol and drug use, mood swings, or chemical imbalances in the blood. Lab tests can screen for these indicators,. which is why Emergency Room admissions will usually have a toxicity panel and blood gas analysis ordered before key triage decisions are made

It is the numbing of depressive individuals’ “inner world” that leads to an addiction to sleeping pills, diet pills, pain pills. and other abuses of limited- schedule prescriptipn medication.

Also, certain incidences of depression syndromes can affect people experiencing a significant life event. PTSD survivors survive traumatic combat ecperiences even though all persons with PTSD did not share the same exact event.

Depression can be suffered among persons who live similar but disparate lives. Today, patients can employ various strategies and methods to combat depression and the behaviors it exacurbates and the condition it worsens.

The patient groups and subgroups, as well as pools of invidividuals who have shared a significant life event, can fall into varying levels of depressive behavior.

People who survived the 9/11 terrorist attack on New York, for example, may have experienced a kind of depression called “survivor’s guilt.” Sufferers of this and many other types of depression are urged tovtalk to support groups and seek treatment from a licensed and qualified healthcare provider.

Nurses will often observe the symptoms of depression in both long-term and acute-care patients. In many cases, an acute-care life event such as a stroke, a heart attack, or a seizure might be triggered from conditions linked to depression.
The patient’s health and safety are paramount at all times. High blood pressure, drinking, drug abuse, atypical personality traits and characteristics of self harm might signal the presence of a depressive person or a depression disorder. Information regarding past treatments of depression be available in the medical chart.
The professional and care plan interventions for depression also can be psychological. A trained medical professional can analyze the patient’s history and recommend coping strategies. Together with a psychologist, the patient can try exercises aimed at breaking down the supporting anxieties of the depressive condition.
One thing a medical expert on treating depression will do is examine what circumstances or scenarios trigger the patient’s depression. Gaining perspective on one’s life and using physical and mental energy can give a patient a more level understanding of exactly a threat really is.
Mental health professionals have worked hard to remove the stigma of depression.Encouraging a patientbto get treatment is a much more effectice intervention.
After a treatment referral is done, outreach to a qualified provider is made. This depressopn therapist can devise techniques that eliminate the focus on negative patterns, self-destructive behavior, and developing a sad or poor attitude that can lead to a negative spiral.

At this point ending isolation and developing resources to prevent downswings in mood is a key dual goal. Gaining control of flexibility and less destruction to extremes can allow a person with depressive tendencies to steer themselves away from harmful behavior and towards goal-centric future rewards.

Handling Patient Visitors

Until you see the light in a patient’s eye, when their relatives come, how their face lights up, you just haven’t lived. The sum total of life is right there. The programmatic dynamic of parents raising children is reversed. The residents (parents) now received the care from visitors (children). It is a singular statement in every individual patient’s case what kind of care they get from family members. Just as people look the other way in a community when children are abused, a low-level nursing home gathers the neglected ones together. It takes a compassionate care nurse approach to make sure patients don’t feel neglected or overwhelmed.

Nurses in any pay range should report any examples of abuse to their nursing manager or as an anonymous complaint to the regional ombudsman. The County Health Facilities Director may also take an anonymous complaint alleging abuse. Nurses in acute care and skilled nursing should counseled to look out for signs and symptoms of abuse and should make an assessment in the chart accordingly. If patients should complain of missed medications, pain, unusual symptoms or worries concerning their care, the charge nurse should be notified.

The sliding scale of who and what family members come to visit is one nurses will become familiar with. Some visitors only show up once a year, on birthdays or anniversaries. Some people bring the whole family, and it can be overwhelming for a recovering patient or fragile resident. Sometimes visitors bring children or babies to encourage the older resident or family member to enjoy the family life absent in a skilled nursing facility or acute care hospital.

Nurses should make sure visitors should wash their hands before skin or physical contact with the patient, administer or deliver no medications or narcotics, and otherwise observe infection control best practices at all times in and around the patient‘s room and bathroom. Visitors and family, friends and relatives may not realize that resident of a skilled nursing facility or patients in acute care are extra vulnerable to viruses, colds, and other communicable diseases. Diabetic patients should be discouraged from overdoing it indulging on special “treats’ that can harm their health and change their blood sugar and cause a crisis.

Others come every weekend, and bring things or even help with the physical care and chores of a nursing home patient. usually, among nurses, this will reflect the status of a patient’s relationship to the visitor. Nurses should be vigilant if a patient shows a marked dejection after certain visitors come, or a tendency to depression after no visitors come. Such patients should be redirected to group activities or have the activities director contact relatives and suggest a family visit.

While financially the nurses know and differentiate between cash-pay residents and Medicaid or Medicare recipients, technically there should be no cognizance of the patient’s status when treating them or attending their bedside needs. health care should be available to everyone regardless of the ability to pay. By seeing the way the patients are treated, some nurses also differentiate between patients who receive visits and those who do not. This can be an unfair but persistent bias.

There is one simple rule for this: the family members and visitors of a nursing home patient will track neglect or have conversations with the patients where criticisms or reports might reach the ears of others. It is essential in some cases to keep frequent visitors’ parents (patients) well cared for, as the family member will appear at any time all day, or stay during significant parts of the day during one single shifts. That one family member will not see the effort the nurses put forth for the rest of the shift for the rest of the floor, but they can make enough noise t bother the managers and owners of the facility for months.

It is hard to watch a CNA or LVN favor a patient or set of patients whose relatives frequently visit, while the ones who need contact and pepping up most fall to the end of the range. One can watch a single nurse neglect a patient’s bed, person, or dignity outright, and hustle to the next room to cascade attention and caregiving on the least in need patient in the place. But this is what happens when nurse managers do not periodically refresh the training and motivation of nursing staff.

Any nursing home patient that has a visit from a relative or friend, social worker or investigator from the county health department, must have them sign in to the visitor’s register. there is usually a physician’s room or private area where an investigator can conduct I interviews or research charts. Additionally, medical records staff will make themselves available t assure any visitor they receive the most assistance possible.

Nursing for Sports Medicine

Nursing for sports medicine is a big movement in local and general practice health. The popularity of gyms, sports, and teenage and high school league sports, as well as childhood league sports can crowd a waiting room with single patient injuries or an entire team of them. The demands of the nursing challenge for these situations test nurses on their diagnostic skills, patient communication skills, and observational aptitude for patients who may not want their physical conditions commented upon or checked out.

The high school and college professional team sports system is rife with excesses that endanger student health. Education system nurses should brush up on sports medicine for concussions, artificial performance enhancements in teenager and young adults, and other wellness related issues for young athletes and sports participants of any age. Anorexia, alcohol abuse, drug abuse, and illegal substances may cloud behavior and vital signs.  Nurses should learn to read patients of all ages that might conceal or confuse physicians who may not factor in other elements in the patient diagnosis due to a lack of information.

Occupational sports medicine can have a broad range of employment opportunities. A television show where the contestants lose weight should have a physical wellness consultant to examine patients during extreme events and competitions. A recreational cruise should have a competent nurse to review case of passengers who have disabilities or health issue before they come on board.

Nurses should know about the ramification of high school sports and college sports, and recreational sports play and how much delivers patents in pain to the hospital on a regular basis. Sadly, people have a mind to ignore hat their doctor tells them and play anyway. Nurse should be rote in the conditions of sports related concussions, trauma, bruising, bone breaks and sprains, muscle tears and the incidence and symptoms for a diagnosis of concussion.

Nurses for sports medicine might branch off after years of general health practitioner employment or LVN work in the treatment of sports-related concussions and other sports injuries. In children and teenage athletes, there is the potential for serious long-term outcomes, such as brain damage, dementia and other risks such as substance abuse after the injury or trauma. Weekend athletes are prone to even more injury because they are likely out of condition or aging, not warmed up or not wearing suitable support equipment.

Emergency rooms can be filled with skateboard kids, bikers, roller skaters and surfers who refuse to wear proper headgear, pads, knee guards, etc. Participating in sports activities in the wrong time and place can also result in physicial injury. Sports concussions have a window of serious concern following immediate hospitalization where the patient must be scrutinized for brain damage, motor neuron fluctuations, synapse irregularity, or other disorders of the brain.

The competent sports medicine nurse will be able to diagnose and define sports-related concussions and the seriousness of the and the sports in which they are most often found. Family friends, and the patient (and coach) will want to know the immediate and long-term symptoms of bone breaks, fractures, and sports-related concussions. Nurses can take the opportunity in seminars and clinicals to discuss expert recommendations for preventing and managing sports-related concussions, to pass onto students and patients.

When Nurse Training Fails

Nurses lacking training dealing with general population, the public by phone, patients specifically and staff can lose their performance rating or even their jobs by letting their “slips show”. There are some examples where proper training, research and learning might have saved the day. In many cases the motivation for a patient to care for themselves and look forward to recovery can be affected. Assertive nurse supervisors may care to review the following real-life scenarios.

1. Proper Device Maintenance

Recently a patient approached the ward office and asked for a blood sugar reading. But the patient was made to wait 45 minutes while the lost battery to operate the device was found. But it was never found. A line formed in the nursing area while the incompetent nurse floundered around asking other nurses what to do. The nurse responsible could not make the blood sugar machine work because they did not know what a “C” battery looked like. This is evidence of lack of training.

They didn’t know how to replace the battery. They didn’t know how to find a new “C” battery, replace it in the device, and return it to the ward counter. The patient stood there in shock. No other nurse could do it either. The blood sugar count machine, the reason for their admission actually, was never derived upon discharge because the nurses were not sufficiently trained to replace a required battery in a critical piece of hospital equipment used on the recorded vitals for every single patient on the ward.

True Story. They couldn’t find the key to the room with the battery in it. The nurse went twice to the room but could not identify the correct battery. The nurse got bored attending to the task and went off to do something else..

Now, imagine you are the patient. Is this chronic ineptitude at a crucial moment? Poor nurse training or laziness? Or merely habitual inattention to detail that costs a patient time and energy? These things matter. Proper nurse training is a needed element for contemporary hospital care that patients need.

2. Backing Up New Admissions

Emergency rooms all over the nation are overfilled. This is due to administrative shortfalls in overall hospital design and throughput which cannot be addressed fully in this arena. Yet the only route almost all patients have is through the Emergency Room, and through general care and primary care admissions to the a hospital or wards. Nurses must process these admissions. Nurse without proper training and support to do the best job possible do a disservice both to themselves and others.

Unprofessional nurses stave off new admissions because they are lazy and do not want the additional responsibility. When an administrator calls the ward to see if they can accept a new admission, the charge nurse must assess the condition of the wing. Poorly conditioned equipment and nurses creating patient/nurse disputes put their ward at risk for lowered ratio caregiving and lost hours. Supervisors tend to assign less effective, poorly trained nurses fewer hours and shifts,

The admission process involves a careful review of all needed medications and the programmed timing of each. Patients who are admitted are dependent on the nurses to fulfill their medical needs via pharmaceuticals in a capsule. Therefore as time passes, properly trained nurses are on a time clock from the moment a new admission is announced. Better trained nurses address their patient admission tasks promptly. Poorly trained nurses go smoke cigarettes and delay patient tasks as long as they can.

Nurses must submit the medicine orders for each patient in time for them to be administered to the patient on time. The patient may not have any other medications on them and be in pain or distress without this assistance. But the attending or resident physicians may not be the same primary care physicians familiar to the case. And many of the medications the patient needs require physician approval due to their qualities and restrictions(narcotics). Sitting on these orders and coordinating poorly with the pharmacy is a sign of poor nurse training.

In the incidence of the above example, a nurse the ward had tasked with restoring batteries to the devices on the ward was never completed. This had not been done overnight on the night shift. (We’ll call her Sue). When the new nursing shift came in for duty, all of their patient vital statistics recording were delayed until the battery issue could be addressed. This extended hours of all the nurses on shift, a further cost of inadequate nurse training.

This was not part of the nursing handoff report because it did nt accord to any patient records. But many blood sugar readings were not tracked because the machines were not working. The nurses (though their ineptitude) made sure that enough machines were offline to delay any incoming admissions. This would give them a break between new admissions and handling current patient cases.

3. Patient Baiting

The removing any standard of case with or without ward notice constitutes patient baiting. Since the onus of treatment ends when a patent discharges themselves, malicious nurses or simple even careless ones can harass a patient into leaving by providing care that is substandard enough to make a patient believe they are better off out of a hospital or doctor’s care.

Patient Baiting takes place largely while doctors and physicians are out of circulation. Since the current staffing model of any healthcare facility is spread so thin doctors are rarely hanging around, the patient can be long gone before the physician has noticed there is any problem. Since an onsite nursing administration faculty is prone to covering up the problem, only the patient loses.

Except in this era of online reporting, increased institutional oversight, and streamlined problem solving, a nurse’s performance may come up for review. Nurses cannot pick and chose which patients they want to be nice to, or respond to handsome or pretty people in preference to others. Nurse training should orient the caregiver to apply best nursing practices and standards to every patient, not just the “favorites”.

If two nurses, (Let’s call them Cynthia and Neemar), decide not to administer standard care to a patient and make them all a doctor or come to the nurse’s managerial wing to address problems, they have been guilty of patient baiting. It speaks to the poor training of a shift charge nurse that they let this happen. This drains nurse power because the attention of other nurses and the supervisory staff is distracted from care issues.

But this places more of a burden on other nurses, who must make up the shortfall if the charge nurse assigns them to the patient or if the patient is moved to a new wing. The time and energy this drains from other personnel can never be repaired.

4. IV Maintenance

Intravenous therapy was invented to deliver treatment to the vein. The IV machine is now used for everything from infection to hydration. The care treatment plan for any patient now requires in almost every state an IV plug/PICC line so at any time emergency administration of fluids or other medicine can be transmitted this way.

An IV machine placed in a patient room is under the operation of the nurse at all times. Visitors, patients, and family members must be made to know this. Dehydration drips are administered for patients even not under the care plan because changes in their condition may require it. Nurses who are poorly trained cannot handle the responsibility of checking the IV line periodically so that shifts in patient arm or hand positioning may change its effectiveness. Properly trained nurses will instruct patients how to rest their arms and hands so as to not disturb medical product distribution.

The administration of an IV line is the charge nurse’s alone. If the nurse observes a technical problem with the device, they should report it or exchange for a properly working one. There variable settings for IV usage that a nurse should be trained to use. In nursing practice, where patients are lodged more than one to a room, the noise should be kept to a minimum to afford proper rest for others.

Alarms on an IV machine go off when the power is disconnected or battery winds down, or the treatment product runs its course. The alarm setting on an IV machine is usually denoted by a small bell, which should be set to “off”. IV fluids can run concurrently. Set an alarm for when it will finish!

But when a machine is not running properly the noises and alarms can buzz in an annoying manner and create a need for the nurse to constantly return to the same room. Setting one or all of the medications to “Gravity drip” can assist in providing rest for all the patients in the room and reduce the need for technical review of the equipment through the night.

5. Inability to Admit/Report a Mistake

If a nurse notices they have made an error or committed a breach of institutional or care treatment policy, their best practice to to report it or advise a supervisor who can take action. Patients can report this to nursing administration. Simple mistakes can be rectified by peers if necessary. More important errors concerning medications, treatment, or patient interaction can be addressed by a supervisor. Without this accountability nurses should think of working in other professions.

 

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